Posted by Sam McCurdy on Nov 13, 2020
 
 
Australia is the last developed country with a trachoma problem, as it is still present in remote Aboriginal communities. How can this be?
 
Trachoma is an eye infection. Repeated infection can lead to permanent blindness. The infections can be treated  quickly, effectively and even prevented by improving personal and community hygiene.   The World Health Organisation has a global goal to eliminate trachoma by 2020. 
 
The work of the Australian Government, the Fred Hollows Foundation and Indigenous Eye Health to treat trachoma infections has seen rates in affected communities reduced substantially. But now, we need to ensure that hygiene practices and the community environments are improved to completely eliminate the disease.
 
Our Club's 'End Trachoma' Champion is Jane Moore. Jane will be asking us all to get some supplies to assemble into 45 hygiene kits for Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory.  Please contact Jane on Jane@cinet.com.au if you can help.
 
The Hygiene Kits cost $50, or you can shop for the items yourself. The shopping list to get going is:
  • Face washer (colour match face washer & hand towel - variety of colours)
  • Hand towel (colour match hand towel & face towel - variety of colours)
  • Bar of soap (full size)
  • Soap container
  • Toothbrush (please wait until we know the age of children)
  • Toothbrush holderToothpaste (family size)
  • Shampoo (family size)
  • Conditioner (family size)
  • Comb/brush
  • Deodorant (non aerosol) (please wait until we know the age of the children) 
  • 1 litre reusable drink bottle (ability to write child's name on bottle)
  • hair scrunchie (optional)
  • Something special e.g. photo of Club members or school kids, words of encouragement, a letter or drawing from a school student etc  Feel free to be creative and put a smile on their faces 😊.
Please have a look at the video and also visit the End Trachoma website: https://www.endtrachoma2020.org.au/ to learn more about how a simple hygiene kit will end Trachoma in Australia.